ASUS P6X58E-Pro X58 Motherboard
Author: Michael O'Neill
Editor: Shawn Knight
Date: 09-05-2011
Provided by: ASUS
Pages:
Installation

The following is the hardware the board will be tested with:

• Intel Core i7 930
• Tuniq Tower 120 Extreme HSF
• 6GB Kingston HyperX PC20000 DDR3
• x3 Intel X-25e G1 (RAID 0)
• Antec Nine Hundred Case
• 1000 Watt Rosewill PSU
• eVGA Geforce GTX260
• Windows 7 Ultimate x64

Hardware installation was uneventful and presented no challenges. The placement of the capacitors and voltage regulators as well as the heatpipes and sinks provides more than enough room for a performance CPU heatsink. A Tuniq Tower 120 extreme was used here and there were no obstruction issues, even with this monster of a heatsink. The SATA headers on this board come off at right angles in respect to the board so there is no need to use right angle SATA cables to accomplish a neat and managed look. The easy headers make hooking up the front panel LEDs and controls simple and there is no need to dig the manual out to see what's what. The I/O plate was snug, but installed easily into the Antec Nine Hundred case it was put into.

Also worth noting is the on-board power, reset, and CMOS clear buttons that ASUS has used for the past couple years now on its performance boards. This is good for those tweaking or troubleshooting a board as it can be controlled outside of a case. There is also an abundance of fan headers, six in total. All other headers and slots are clearly labeled and ASUS made it really easy to understand what's what and where it is, even if you don't have a manual handy.


The rear panel is full of ports including two eSATA ports, two USB 3.0 ports, six USB 2.0 ports, one Firewire port, six audio ports, one SPDIF port, one network port and a combo PS/2 port. This combo PS/2 port can accommodate a PS/2 mouse or keyboard for those of you that are old school. This strikes a balance between legacy support and not wasting I/O panel space on old devices. Speaking of old devices, this board has no serial or parallel ports to speak of which shouldn't be a big deal in this day and age, but worth mentioning.


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