Cooler Master Centurion 590 Mid-Tower
Author: Zahn Funk
Editor: Shawn Knight
Date: 04-09-2008
Provided by: Cooler Master
Pages:
Installation


The Centurion 590 was very easy to work with; standoffs were screwed into the motherboard tray and the board attached. Cables were plenty long enough to reach where they were needed. The tool-less riser clips and drive bay hold downs were some of the most simple and effective I've used. The hard drive cage has screws holding it in addition to the tool-less clips, otherwise it's a bit loose in the bay. The cage has to be removed in order to install the hard drives, but I'm glad to see Cooler Master use rubber grommets to mount these. Snap on rails are nice but don't do anything to cut down on vibration and noise. Enough screws are included to populate all four drive positions, another plus as many mid-tower cases only provide room for three. If you still use a floppy, the adapter bracket must also be removed in order to install the drive.


The power supply is able to mount in the case either way. I elected to install it upside-down. There is not a lot of space under the case for airflow to come in through the grill opening. I'd rather the power supply work as an exhaust fan to help extract air from inside the case. There is a hole at the bottom of the motherboard tray for power supply cabling to pass through to the other side, as well as a full length slot between the front of the tray and the bay rails to hide other wiring. There are also slots in the tray at various points to allow using zip ties, although depending on the length of your power supply cables, they may not be long enough to go behind the tray and back out, as it was for me.

I didn't run into any issues installing hardware into the Centurion 590 case. In fact, it seems very spacious for a mid-tower. Let's wrap up with some final thoughts and conclusion.


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