Overclocking the Socket 754 AMD Socket 64
Author: Shawn Knight
Editor: Frank Stroupe
Date: 02-22-2005
Pages:
Page 1


While contemplating a title for this article, I encountered many fitting choices. "Overclocking the AMD Athlon 64 3000+" seemed like a good candidate at first thought. While I will be overclocking on a 3000+ chip, the information within could be applied to other speed CPU's as well. Another title, "Budget overclocking an AMD Athlon 64", seemed fitting as well, but the word "budget" just wasn't cutting it for me. Maybe something more along the lines of "financially challenged" would sound better? Anyway, I finally decided on "Overclocking the Socket 754 AMD Athlon 64" for a few reasons. You see, I had originally intended to write one big Athlon 64 article, but as I would learn later through hours of testing and research, it would be best to write a 754 article AND a 939 article. So with this being said, off we go...

Back in September of last year (2004), I was in desperate need of a system upgrade. My Socket A 1700 XP was no longer getting the job done and I needed something faster. AMD's Athlon 64 Socket 754 had been available for quite some time, while the Socket 939 setups were still relatively new and more importantly, expensive. Borrowing a note from the paragraph above, yes, I was "financially challenged". I ended up going with a 3000+ CPU ( $165 at time of purchase), Gigabyte GA-K8NS Motherboard ( $76 at time of purchase) and something that I probably didn't need, a 74GB Western Digital Raptor Hard Drive ( $179.99 at time of purchase). I went into this purchase with the intention of not overclocking, or at least that is what I kept trying to tell myself. The CPU was the second cheapest at Newegg, coming in at just a little more than the 2800+ CPU. The motherboard was the cheapest I could find at the time, and needless to say, I didn't expect to overclock much with a $76 board. The Raptor turned out to be one of the best investments I've ever made. The sheer speed of a 10,000 RPM drive and the fact that none of my friends had one gave me a slight advantage. Anyway, the CPU and motherboard set me back a total of $241, which at the time, was not bad at all for an Athlon 64 system. I planned on using the stock AMD OEM heatsink and my other system components for the build.


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